Driving Forces - Responsibility

Responsibility

At Stanley Black & Decker, we grow with our communities and we take action to help those who work for a better future.

We create products, tools and solutions for those who make the world. We have and always will take that responsibility to heart. We operate in a way that generates a sustainable impact for the world and are committed to supporting those who strive to make the world better. See how we’ve demonstrated this responsibility for 175 years.

Stories on Responsibility

Stanlo: Making the World, Piece by Piece

 

 

1872

The Stanley tack shop and its employees during the 1880s. This building burned down in June 1892, marking the end of Stanley’s tack business.1

1872

Employees of Stanley Rule & Level pose in front of the New Britain facilities, 1872.2

1875

An aerial drawing of the city of New Britain, Connecticut, in 1875.3

1879

The Stanley Works, as depicted in the company’s 1879 catalog.4

1883

Irwin founder Charles H. Irwin’s drugstore in Martinsville, Ohio, 1883.5

1889

General J.W. Denver, for whom the city of Denver is named, was a principal investor in The Irwin Auger Bit Company and was elected its first president. He also purchased the first shares of Irwin capital stock in 1889.6

1890

Letter signed by William Hart, who served as president of The Stanley Works from 1884 to 1915, describing plans for a new, stronger hinge in 1890.7 Hart’s leadership promoted growth and development of new products, setting up Stanley for success in the 20th century.8

1890s

Railroads were the fastest way to ship goods across the country in the 1890s. These railroad tracks allowed raw materials to be brought in and finished goods to be shipped out from The Irwin Auger Bit Works Dept. No. 3.

1896

Stanley Rule & Level’s Sound Money Club. They advocated for William McKinley’s gold standard instead of William Jennings Bryan’s “Free Silver” policy during the 1896 U.S. presidential election.9

1915

Stanley executives pose for a photograph in 1915. E. Allen Moore, who became president in 1918, is seated front row center in the light-colored suit.10

1916

The Board of Directors outside The Irwin Auger Bit Company, 1916.

1918

E. Allen Moore served as president of The Stanley Works from 1918 to 1923 and chairman from 1923 to 1929. During his tenure, he introduced systems and procedures that modernized the way Stanley did business and interacted with its employees.11

1918

Female factory workers outside of the Black & Decker plant in Towson, Maryland, in 1918. During World War I, many women joined the workforce while men fought on the frontlines.12

1919

William Dimmitt, left, inventor of the Irwin Auger Bit, and his brother, Joseph.13

1919

Four Stanley Works drivers and their trucks in 1919.14

1920s

A 1920s hardware store sells Irwin products.

1921

During World War I, The Stanley Workers newsletter was sent overseas to Stanley employees serving in the war. In addition to company news, the publication included letters from servicemen for friends and family back home to read. The newsletter was so popular the company continued to publish it after the war.15

1922

Certificate of Increase of Capital Stock, Irwin Auger Bit Company, 1922.

1923

Clarence F. Bennett was president of The Stanley Works from 1923 to 1941 and chairman from 1941 to 1946. During his tenure, Stanley developed new products and overseas markets to meet the growing demand for hardware, tools and industrial products.16

1928

In 1928, The Stanley Works’ company baseball team won the New Britain Industrial League championships.

1920s-1930s

This pin, which was cast in 24-karat gold, was given to Stanley Works employees with 10 years of service.17

1930s

During the Great Depression, The Stanley Works converted its factories to produce Stanlo sets, a toy made up of metal pieces put together with pins to inspire a budding engineer or construction worker. Some of the larger sets included electric motors.18

1930s

This image, which was used in Irwin advertising, depicts a man showing an Irwin Auger drill bit to his son, circa 1930s.

1936

Hardware Trade and Sporting Goods magazine runs an Irwin advertisement, 1936. The company held a giveaway of its Irwin DeLuxe No. 2 screwdriver so that prospective customers could see that the tool was a high-quality product.

1937

The Irwin Auger polishing department poses for a photo in Wilmington, Ohio, in 1937.

1941

A 1941 advertisement featured aircraft production workers at the Boeing plant in Seattle using Craftsman tools.19

1943

George F. Sheffer of the screw machine department posing with representatives from the U.S. Army and Navy at a reception honoring BLACK+DECKER for its wartime achievements. The company received four Army-Navy “E” Awards.20

1943

Stanley won the coveted Army-Navy “E” Award in 1943, the same year the company celebrated its centennial.21

1950s

Female factory workers producing industrial drills in the 1950s.22 *

1961

In 1961, The Stanley Works acquired the Magnelite Plant in Omaha, Nebraska.23

1968

A dinner in honor of Stanley’s 125th anniversary in 1968. From left: U.S. Representative Thomas J. Meskill, Stanley President Donald Davis, U.S. Senator Abraham Ribicoff, and New Britain Mayor Paul Manafort, Sr.24

1974

The groundbreaking on the Cheraw, South Carolina, plant. Completed in 1974, the 163,000-square-foot plant produced screwdrivers.25

1981

President Jimmy Carter’s staff gave him a complete set of Craftsman woodworking tools at the end of his presidency.26

1984

The handle of a Black & Decker tool featuring a logo honoring the restoration of the Statue of Liberty in 1984. Black & Decker was a sponsor of the restoration project.27

1993

It’s been 25 years since Stanley celebrated its 150th anniversary, but the mentality remains the same: Proud of our past, focused on our future.

*Historical photo. Always use products per their instructions and intended use.

 


 

[1] Rodengen, Jeffrey L. The Legend of Stanley: 150 years of The Stanley Works. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Write Stuff Syndicate, 1996. 41.
[2] 1996 150 Years of Stanley Works. Pdf Pg. 66-67
[3] Rodengen, Jeffrey L. The Legend of Stanley: 150 years of The Stanley Works. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Write Stuff Syndicate, 1996. 37.
[4] Rodengen, Jeffrey L. The Legend of Stanley: 150 years of The Stanley Works. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Write Stuff Syndicate, 1996. 38.
[5] 2005 Irwin History Overview.pdf
[6] 18 100 years of Irwin.pdf
[7] Letter
[8] 1996 150 Years of Stanley Works.pdf, Chapter 2
[9] Rodengen, Jeffrey L. The Legend of Stanley: 150 years of The Stanley Works. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Write Stuff Syndicate, 1996. 68.
[10] 1996 150 Years of Stanley Works.pdf pg. 58
[11] 1996 150 Years of Stanley Works.pdf pg. 48-49
[12] Scott, Otto J. The powered hand: the story of Black & Decker. Washington: Uncommon Books, 1994. Image insert 1
[13] Alternative photo of same image also says, " William Dimmitt L 1845-1919 Joseph Dimmit Bro R 1839-1909 .tif”
[14] Rodengen, Jeffrey L. The Legend of Stanley: 150 years of The Stanley Works. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Write Stuff Syndicate, 1996. 61.

[15] 1996 150 Years of Stanley Works.pdf pg. 59
[16] 1996 150 Years of Stanley Works.pdf pg. 80-84
[17] Rodengen, Jeffrey L. The Legend of Stanley: 150 years of The Stanley Works. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Write Stuff Syndicate, 1996. 79.
[18] Rodengen, Jeffrey L. The Legend of Stanley: 150 years of The Stanley Works. Fort Lauderdale, FL: Write Stuff Syndicate, 1996. 85.
[19] See text of advertisement
[20] Army Navy Production Award Pamphlet. Towson, MD: Black & Decker, 1943.
[21] Levitt, Robert K. Foundations for the Future. The History of Stanley Works. New Britain, CT: Privately Published, 1951. 138.
[22] timeframe taken from clothes/glasses. The drill was introduced in 1946 so it had to have been after that.
[23] Some Acquisitions.pdf pg 2
[24] 1996 150 Years of Stanley Works. Pdf Pg. 113. Name of mayor cut off in caption, information comes from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayor_of_New_Britain,_Connecticut
[25] Welcome to Stanley Tools.pdf pg 7
[26] Craftsman Binder_Text only.pdf pg 16.
[27] Mckerrow, Steve. “The Statue of Liberty.” The Evening Sun, 1984

 

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